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The Well Trained Mind - Guide to classical education

The Well Trained Mind - Guide to classical education

A Definition for Classical Education

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Those who incorporate the reading of ancient classical authors, and declare this to be of the very essence of any education which could be styled as Classical, are actually referring to what might better be called a Classical Humanist Education. We do not mean to call them a bad name when we use the term humanist. A humanist in the classical sense is one who studies what are called the "humanities," primarily classical Greek and Roman literature.

We pursue a narrower definition of "Classical Education." We are more interested in teaching by the same educational principles and toward the same educational goals as the ancients than in teaching the same literature as the ancients. We do not necessarily pursue the Classical materials – Homer and Plato, or Caesar and Cicero. Instead, we necessarily pursue the Classical Model of Child Development and the Classical Method for Teaching Subjects. We call this the Applied Trivium. [more...]

10-12-2007

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A Definition for Classical Education - Classical Method - Homeschool Links - Homeschool Resources

For more links visit:

The Well Trained Mind - Guide to classical education

The Well Trained Mind - Guide to classical education

A Definition for Classical Education

Bookmark and Share

Those who incorporate the reading of ancient classical authors, and declare this to be of the very essence of any education which could be styled as Classical, are actually referring to what might better be called a Classical Humanist Education. We do not mean to call them a bad name when we use the term humanist. A humanist in the classical sense is one who studies what are called the "humanities," primarily classical Greek and Roman literature.

We pursue a narrower definition of "Classical Education." We are more interested in teaching by the same educational principles and toward the same educational goals as the ancients than in teaching the same literature as the ancients. We do not necessarily pursue the Classical materials – Homer and Plato, or Caesar and Cicero. Instead, we necessarily pursue the Classical Model of Child Development and the Classical Method for Teaching Subjects. We call this the Applied Trivium. [more...]

10-12-2007

Comments

This article hasn't been commented yet.

Write a comment

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3 + 6 =