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Home Learning year by year.

Home Learning year by year.

Classical Education

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Classical learning is called "classical" because future leaders have been trained in its methods for centuries. In fact, some parts of the classical curriculum have been around for millennia.

Classical learning follows a particular pattern called the Trivium -- which consists of grammar, dialectic, and rhetoric. The students learn the grammar of each subject (that subject's "particulars"). They then learn dialectic, or the relationships of these particulars to one another, and then go on to learn rhetoric. That is, they learn how to express what they have gained in an effective and coherent fashion.[ more... ]

Continue reading Comments (0) 26-01-2008

The Lost Tools of Learning

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What use is it to pile task on task and prolong the days of labor, if at the close the chief object is left unattained? It is not the fault of the teachers--they work only too hard already. The combined folly of a civilization that has forgotten its own roots is forcing them to shore up the tottering weight of an educational structure that is built upon sand. They are doing for their pupils the work which the pupils themselves ought to do. For the sole true end of education is simply this: to teach men how to learn for themselves; and whatever instruction fails to do this is effort spent in vain. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

What is a Classical Education?

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Classical education depends on a three-part process of training the mind. The early years of school are spent in absorbing facts, systematically laying the foundations for advanced study. In the middle grades, students learn to think through arguments. In the high school years, they learn to express themselves. This classical pattern is called the trivium. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

Why Classical Education

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The study of the great books has been the backbone of good education for centuries. If you look at the books read by the intellectual giants of our culture, you find that there are particular books that come up again and again. These books were required of most schoolboys until the rise of Dewey and the democratization of education through the public school system. The public school system saw these books as elitist and not easily comprehensible by the masses and therefore not appropriate for public education. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

Return to proven classical educational methods

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Educators are returning to classical education as modern educational methods continue to produce high school graduates who are not only functionally illiterate and lacking in critical thinking skills, but morally bankrupt as well.

Inside you will find historic and modern explanations of classical education, an analysis of the trivium and its components, ideas for the practical application of classical education to homeschooling from experienced homeschoolers and other educators, a complete curriculum guide and online catalog for grades K-12, networking opportunities with other classical educators, comprehensive links to Internet resources for classical education, and much more. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

A Comparison of Different Methods and Approaches to Homeschooling

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We will compare some of the different methods and approaches to Homeschooling with which many of us are already familiar. Before doing so, let us review the Trivium Model of Child Development. Children pass through several developmental stages or levels of learning. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

A Definition for Classical Education

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Those who incorporate the reading of ancient classical authors, and declare this to be of the very essence of any education which could be styled as Classical, are actually referring to what might better be called a Classical Humanist Education. We do not mean to call them a bad name when we use the term humanist. A humanist in the classical sense is one who studies what are called the "humanities," primarily classical Greek and Roman literature.

We pursue a narrower definition of "Classical Education." We are more interested in teaching by the same educational principles and toward the same educational goals as the ancients than in teaching the same literature as the ancients. We do not necessarily pursue the Classical materials – Homer and Plato, or Caesar and Cicero. Instead, we necessarily pursue the Classical Model of Child Development and the Classical Method for Teaching Subjects. We call this the Applied Trivium. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

Understanding the Classical and Christian Difference

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Few investments have more potential than your children's education. The way they see the world, the way they approach life, and the depth of their character are all influenced by education. The choice of where and how to educate your children can be challenging and complicated. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

Four Approaches to the Study of Ancient Literature

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The purpose of this article is to help Christians to develop their own Biblical approach to evaluating literature. We cannot describe every possible approach, but we will briefly describe three common approaches to the study of classical literature, then we will explain our own distinct approach.

Nobody has appointed us judge over what others think or do, but we do have to judge what we ourselves think and do, and others may be able to use our opinions to help them explore the issues themselves. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

Three Pillars of Classical Education

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From ancient times, one of the primary goals for education was to teach a student how to teach himself. The simple idea behind this was that if we train a student in the skills of learning, then he will continue to learn on his own for the remainder of his life. This may be contrasted with the modern concept called "life-long learning," which does not train a student in the skills of learning, but only trains him to perform individual tasks. As a result, the student must continually return to his trainer for more training. In other words, the basic skills of ancient learning will make us free to learn on our own, but the task-by-task approach of modern learning will enslave us to our taskmasters. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

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Classical Method - Homeschool Links - Homeschool Resources

For more links visit:

Home Learning year by year.

Home Learning year by year.

Classical Education

Bookmark and Share

Classical learning is called "classical" because future leaders have been trained in its methods for centuries. In fact, some parts of the classical curriculum have been around for millennia.

Classical learning follows a particular pattern called the Trivium -- which consists of grammar, dialectic, and rhetoric. The students learn the grammar of each subject (that subject's "particulars"). They then learn dialectic, or the relationships of these particulars to one another, and then go on to learn rhetoric. That is, they learn how to express what they have gained in an effective and coherent fashion.[ more... ]

Continue reading Comments (0) 26-01-2008

The Lost Tools of Learning

Bookmark and Share

What use is it to pile task on task and prolong the days of labor, if at the close the chief object is left unattained? It is not the fault of the teachers--they work only too hard already. The combined folly of a civilization that has forgotten its own roots is forcing them to shore up the tottering weight of an educational structure that is built upon sand. They are doing for their pupils the work which the pupils themselves ought to do. For the sole true end of education is simply this: to teach men how to learn for themselves; and whatever instruction fails to do this is effort spent in vain. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

What is a Classical Education?

Bookmark and Share

Classical education depends on a three-part process of training the mind. The early years of school are spent in absorbing facts, systematically laying the foundations for advanced study. In the middle grades, students learn to think through arguments. In the high school years, they learn to express themselves. This classical pattern is called the trivium. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

Why Classical Education

Bookmark and Share

The study of the great books has been the backbone of good education for centuries. If you look at the books read by the intellectual giants of our culture, you find that there are particular books that come up again and again. These books were required of most schoolboys until the rise of Dewey and the democratization of education through the public school system. The public school system saw these books as elitist and not easily comprehensible by the masses and therefore not appropriate for public education. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

Return to proven classical educational methods

Bookmark and Share

Educators are returning to classical education as modern educational methods continue to produce high school graduates who are not only functionally illiterate and lacking in critical thinking skills, but morally bankrupt as well.

Inside you will find historic and modern explanations of classical education, an analysis of the trivium and its components, ideas for the practical application of classical education to homeschooling from experienced homeschoolers and other educators, a complete curriculum guide and online catalog for grades K-12, networking opportunities with other classical educators, comprehensive links to Internet resources for classical education, and much more. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

A Comparison of Different Methods and Approaches to Homeschooling

Bookmark and Share

We will compare some of the different methods and approaches to Homeschooling with which many of us are already familiar. Before doing so, let us review the Trivium Model of Child Development. Children pass through several developmental stages or levels of learning. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

A Definition for Classical Education

Bookmark and Share

Those who incorporate the reading of ancient classical authors, and declare this to be of the very essence of any education which could be styled as Classical, are actually referring to what might better be called a Classical Humanist Education. We do not mean to call them a bad name when we use the term humanist. A humanist in the classical sense is one who studies what are called the "humanities," primarily classical Greek and Roman literature.

We pursue a narrower definition of "Classical Education." We are more interested in teaching by the same educational principles and toward the same educational goals as the ancients than in teaching the same literature as the ancients. We do not necessarily pursue the Classical materials – Homer and Plato, or Caesar and Cicero. Instead, we necessarily pursue the Classical Model of Child Development and the Classical Method for Teaching Subjects. We call this the Applied Trivium. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

Understanding the Classical and Christian Difference

Bookmark and Share

Few investments have more potential than your children's education. The way they see the world, the way they approach life, and the depth of their character are all influenced by education. The choice of where and how to educate your children can be challenging and complicated. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

Four Approaches to the Study of Ancient Literature

Bookmark and Share

The purpose of this article is to help Christians to develop their own Biblical approach to evaluating literature. We cannot describe every possible approach, but we will briefly describe three common approaches to the study of classical literature, then we will explain our own distinct approach.

Nobody has appointed us judge over what others think or do, but we do have to judge what we ourselves think and do, and others may be able to use our opinions to help them explore the issues themselves. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

Three Pillars of Classical Education

Bookmark and Share

From ancient times, one of the primary goals for education was to teach a student how to teach himself. The simple idea behind this was that if we train a student in the skills of learning, then he will continue to learn on his own for the remainder of his life. This may be contrasted with the modern concept called "life-long learning," which does not train a student in the skills of learning, but only trains him to perform individual tasks. As a result, the student must continually return to his trainer for more training. In other words, the basic skills of ancient learning will make us free to learn on our own, but the task-by-task approach of modern learning will enslave us to our taskmasters. [more...]

Continue reading Comments (0) 10-12-2007

<< First < Previous [1 / 2] Next > Last >>